Author Topic: Seat disassembly / reference  (Read 13202 times)

Offline S2tpw

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Seat disassembly / reference
« on: July 21, 2012, 10:57:43 PM »
As promised here are some reference pics for seat restoration. In time hopefully this will document the outcome too. I hope this may help for those seeking to do this since this is an original seat with minor issues, so provides an ideal example of final / partial assembly.

The cover is pulled over spikes in the base. The bottom 25 mm of the cover is a separate strip stitched to the sides. Where this stretches oner the spikes it is covered by 3 things.
The first is a bent and folded steel strip which runs down one side. The second is a flat strip at the front of the saddle, which is retained by metal tabs which pass through the strip and anchors it after.
Over the balance of the spikes, but under the larger tabs is a stitched piece of "piping" about 1 cm wide.

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2012, 11:18:00 PM »
The foam is anchored by a rubber strip which folds over the base edge. Additionally the foam sits on the base anchored by a contact adhesive. This foam needs to be carefully peeled back to avoid damage in separating. The foam base is a composite, made from a cover and series of individual elements on end underneath to provide support. Today this would be a single moulding

The steel base is vulnerable to corrosion since the paint is on bare metal, no primer or undercoat, so little beyond the single layer of red paint and the "glue" to prevent the rot. The final picture show the elements placed on the foam for clarity

In the interests of originality I intend to paint the base (properly) and replace just the cover made from the old one as a pattern by a specialist, with some running repairs to the foam where necessary
« Last Edit: July 21, 2012, 11:28:36 PM by S2tpw »

Offline z50jai

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2012, 10:49:17 AM »
Thanks so much these pics are sweet. I will be able to make mine like the original, well close as possible.
Well done.
Monkey on, Monkey nuts!!!

Offline retroresto77

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2012, 09:23:21 AM »
great stuff! Handy to know what i'll be in for when i disassemble my seat.

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2012, 11:39:04 PM »
I've dropped my cover off at the seat manufacturer's to copy. They will need to strip it to individual panels to pattern properly. I took these pictures which complete the DIY images to help anyone doing their own thing.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2012, 11:47:13 PM by S2tpw »

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2012, 11:41:40 PM »
The last picture shows the two metal strips used to secure the cover. One is simple and flat the other is three dimensional and tricky to fabricate, however here it is
« Last Edit: August 04, 2012, 11:43:31 PM by S2tpw »

Offline babu

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2013, 01:57:33 AM »
top post S2tpw, luv this kind of info.

Offline z50jai

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2013, 09:07:32 AM »
Do you think the side metal strip was on both sides or just the one. It looks like it was maybe there to protect your fingers from getting spiked when you grabbed the side of the seat?
Monkey on, Monkey nuts!!!

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2013, 07:05:36 PM »
Sorry, been absent for a while!

The strip was only on one side, definitively (you probably established that by now, right). The other side uses a strip of folded and stitched seat cover as a packing around the balance of the spikes. I've got the original if anyone needs details.

Now getting back into things, frame etc. out for paint recently, should get back "in November" so seat rebuild should be within the next few weeks, will document.


S2tpw

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2013, 09:25:15 AM »
Ok starting to get back in the saddle (sic). Have now got all my painted items back and most of the chrome. So to the seat....

The new cover i had made is a great replica of the old.

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2013, 09:38:36 AM »
The last picture shows the indent on the seat pad showing where the piping had previously run, although under tension this will move a little downwards towards the front of the seat. Next up is those minor repairs to the foam. In my case the various component parts had clearly never been placed in an exact way. Rather than re-engineer it I decided to support the original. So I cut various pieces to sit between the original elements. Importantly these are only half height, so they add nothing to the feel of the seat, but act as spacers, preventing distortion from the weakening original elements. After this picture I finished the forward repairs. The look isn't great but I was pleased with the mechanical outcome. One other point is that the seat pad at this point has gaps at the rear. It's clear this is prior to the cover which will close these under tension.

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2013, 09:49:35 AM »
The original pad has a rubber lip, which hooks over the painted base. This alone would be a good reason to restore rather than replace a seat pad. If it's missing however, then attaching the pad to the base with adhesive would help. The seat pad itself extends over the base, the base fits "into" the pad, so the base cannot be felt through the finished seat. The rubber lip also protects the cover from the metal base edge, providing a softer edge over which tension can be applied. I think without this the cover would chafe and tear easily...

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2013, 10:35:23 AM »
Next, the cover. The cover should have a skirt, stitched to the main sheet with a stitched hem to close the material. It's this part that folds under and get spiked. It also provides the detail in the shape. If this skirt is missing a lot of extra material will be left to fold and the end result will be messy. This was the prime reason for cloning the original. Make sure all the spikes are exactly where you would want then, none twisted or half open. Now is the time to check. I elected to start at the back since this is the view most seen and any post stretch tidying would need to be as discrete as possible. I started centrally and moved equally around each side, using blunt tools to apply pressure to pierce the cover.

Be prepared for some sore fingers. I kept thinking, as I took my time in doing this, of some Japanese worker in 1964 who was under pressure to do so many of these an hour everyday.
My advice would be don't be too keen to close the spikes, providing a chance to re arrange the cover if necessary. I found closing an occasional one helpful to retain the cover though

Offline S2tpw

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2013, 10:38:09 AM »
More...

Offline scott t

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Re: Seat disassembly / reference
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2013, 01:14:25 PM »
Great job on the seat you can sure see why preparation pays off.
When do we get to see the rest of the bike.
Scott

 

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